Commit 376e2983 authored by Kavindra Palaraja's avatar Kavindra Palaraja
Browse files

Fixes: Some documentation fixes

parent f633d66c
......@@ -950,24 +950,23 @@
You can start Qt Creator from a command prompt with an existing session or
\c{.pro} file by giving the name as argument on the command line.
\bold{Sidebar}
\bold{Show and Hide the Sidebar}
You can hide/unhide the sidebar in the edit and debug mode
by clicking on the corresponding icon on the left bottom.
Keyboard shortcut is \key{Alt+0}.
You can show and hide the the sidebar in \gui Edit and \gui Debug mode by
clicking on the corresponding icon, or by pressing \key{Alt+0}.
\bold{Display signals and slots}
\bold{Display Signals and Slots}
If you have an instance of a class derived from QObject and
want to find all other objects connected to one of its
slots by Qt's signals-and-slots mechanism, enable
\gui{Debug} and \gui{Use Custom Display for Qt Objects}.
In the \gui{Locals and Watchers View}, expand the object's
entry and open the wanted slot in the "slots" subitem. The
objects connect to this slot are exposed as children of
this slot. The same works with signals.
If you have an instance of a class that is derived from QObject, and you
you would like to find all other objects connected to one of your object's
slots using Qt's signals and slots mechanism -- you can enable
\gui{Use Custom Display for Qt Objects} feature under the \gui Debug menu.
\bold{Low level display}
In the \gui{Locals and Watchers} view, expand the object's entry and open
the slot in the \e slots subitem. The objects connected to this slot are
exposed as children of the slot. This method works with signals too.
\bold{Display Low Level Data}
If the special debugging of Qt objects fails due to data
corruption within the debugged objects, you can switch the
......@@ -983,33 +982,38 @@
\title Glossary
\bold{System Qt}
\target glossary-system-qt
The version of Qt installed on your system.
This is the one whose \c qmake command is found in the \c PATH.
\bold{Default Qt}
\target glossary-default-qt
The version of Qt configured in \gui{Tools
-> Options -> Qt 4 -> Default Qt Version}. This is the version
used by new projects. It defaults to the System Qt.
\table
\header
\o Term
\o Meaning
\bold{Project Qt}
\row
\o System Qt \target glossary-system-qt
\o The version of Qt installed on your system. This is the Qt
version for the \c qmake command found in your \c PATH.
\target glossary-project-qt
The version of Qt configured in \gui{Build&Run
-> Build Settings -> Build Configurations}. This is the version
actually used by the project. It defaults to the Default Qt.
\row
\o Default Qt \target glossary-default-qt
\o The version of Qt configured in \gui{Tools -> Options -> Qt 4
-> Default Qt Version}. This is the Qt version used by your
new projects. It defaults to System Qt.
\bold{Shadow Build}
\row
\o Project Qt \target glossary-project-qt
\o The version of Qt configured in \gui{Build&Run -> Build
Settings -> Build Configurations}. This is the Qt version that
is actually used by a particular project. It defaults to
Default Qt.
\target glossary-shadow-build
Shadow building means building the project not in the source directory,
but in a seperate \bold{build directory}. This has the benefit of keeping
the source directory clean. It is also considered "best practice" if
you need many build configurations for a single set of sources.
\row
\o Shadow Build \target glossary-shadow-build
\o Shadow building means building a project in a separate
directory, the \e{build directory}. The build directory is
different from the source directory. One of the benefits of
shadow building is that it keeps your source directory clean.
Shadow building is the best practice if you need many build
configurations for a single set of source.
\endtable
*/
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment